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Insight blog: Posts from the "Working life" Category

Stories about the people, science and research of the Medical Research Council.

Working life: Nutrition scientist Nita Forouhi

6 Feb 2019

Professor Nita Gandhi Forouhi, of the MRC Epidemiology Unit at the University of Cambridge, studies food and nutrition, and how this affects our health. Here she reveals some dietary home truths, the importance of good, solid evidence and her passion for championing equality in science.

Nutrition scientist Professor Nita Forouhi

Professor Nita Forouhi in the clinical testing area of the MRC Epidemiology Unit, used for taking measurements from participants who attend research studies. [...]

Career in brief

  • Medical degree with BSc degree in immunology, Newcastle University
  • Junior doctor jobs in Newcastle and Edinburgh
  • Four-year Wellcome fellowship in clinical epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
  • Specialised in public health in London and Cambridge
  • From postdoc to programme leader and professor at the MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge; honorary consultant public health physician with Public Health England

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Working life: Professor Daniel Freeman

30 Jan 2019

Daniel Freeman, Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Oxford, is pioneering virtual reality (VR) as a treatment for people with severe mental health problems. He tells us about his working life, the inspiration behind his ideas and the large potential for VR beyond gaming.

Professor Daniel Freeman holding a virtual reality headset

  [...]

Career in brief:

  • BA Natural Sciences at the University of Cambridge
  • PhD in psychology and a DClinPsy in clinical psychology at King’s College London
  • Wellcome Trust Fellow at King’s College London
  • MRC Senior Clinical Fellow at the University of Oxford
  • NIHR Research Professor at the University of Oxford

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Max Perutz: science communicator

12 May 2014

Max Perutz, the Austrian-born molecular biologist who founded the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in 1962, won the Nobel Prize for his work deciphering the structure of the blood protein haemoglobin. But he was also a passionate writer and speaker committed to revealing the intricacies of science to new audiences. As we launch the 2014 Max Perutz Science Writing Award, Katherine Nightingale looks back on his forays into the world of words.

Max Perutz being filmed for a BBC television programme circa 1960 (Image copyright: MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology)

Max Perutz being filmed for a BBC television programme circa 1960 (Image copyright: MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology)

Max Perutz knew that there were parallels to be drawn between scientists and writers. In one of his collections of essays, he wrote “Imagination comes first in both artistic and scientific creation ― which makes for one culture rather than two…”

He had a long-held interest in words, keeping a book in which he wrote down quotations that struck him as particularly good, and was a prolific writer of letters to family, friends and colleagues. He began writing popular science articles for magazines such as New Scientist and Scientific American in the 1940s, sometimes about his own research, and sometimes on more personal notes, such as a later New Scientist article on his founding of the LMB.

His popular science articles were full of the analogies and examples to make his research understandable to the general reader. Like many writers, he wasn’t a fan of being edited. [...]

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