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Insight blog: Posts tagged with science festivals

Stories about the people, science and research of the Medical Research Council.

‘Smugging’ – v. To catch someone off guard and show them your science. 

19 Jul 2016

As part of the MRC Festival of Medical Research, one group of scientists struck out from the lab and into the street to explain how our immune system works and how we might be able to make it fight cancer. Dr Martin Christlieb tells us why.

One of a props - a ball of chocolate that says 'Don't eat me!'

A brightly-coloured ball representing a healthy, or potentially dangerous mutant, cell. Image copyright: Peter Canning

How much does your audience care about your science? One answer to this might be ‘slightly less than you do’. We should all allow our passion to shine through when we speak to people, whatever it is. After all, attitudes are infectious. But to be infected, someone has to actually be there to hear the enthusiasm in your voice.  [...]

Continue reading: ‘Smugging’ – v. To catch someone off guard and show them your science. 

No ball games! And other things that might be making kids less active

30 Mar 2016

As part of the Neighbourhoods and Communities programme at the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit led by Professor Anne Ellaway, Dr Paul McCrorie and PhD student Felicity Hayball are looking at how the local environment may determine levels of physical activity in children. They spoke to Sylvie Kruiniger about their research.

running boy crosses the finish line

Copyright: MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow

In the UK, increasingly sedentary lifestyles are being shown to impact upon more than just weight. Creating good habits around physical activity from a young age could help people to stay healthy throughout life. So what gets children outside and moving? What do they like to see? What puts them off? Dr Paul McCrorie and Felicity Hayball are using different methods to find out more about how children respond to their built, natural and social environments. [...]

Continue reading: No ball games! And other things that might be making kids less active

MRC Centenary Open Week

5 Jul 2013

MRC Open Week (20-29 June 2013) was an opportunity for scientists to open their lab doors or get out into the community to share their science with the public. From stand up comedy to sketching, they came up with some inventive ways of doing this. Here we round-up the week’s social media.

 

MRC Open Week (20-29 June 2013) was an opportunity for scientists to open their lab doors or get out into the community to share their science with the public. From stand up comedy to sketching, they came up with some inventive ways of doing this. Here we round-up the week’s social media.

http://storify.com/the_MRC/mrc-centenary-open-week [...]

Continue reading: MRC Centenary Open Week

In pictures: the MRC Centenary Festival

25 Jun 2013

Last weekend we kicked off our Centenary Open Week with a festival at London’s Science Museum. Scientists from 10 MRC-funded units and centres took part in ‘Life: A healthy game of chance and choice’, an activity taking visitors through MRC research related to healthy lives. Here’s Stacy-Ann Ashley with a photo round-up.

(Image copyright: Science Museum/Jennie Hills) [...]

Continue reading: In pictures: the MRC Centenary Festival

Drum roll, please …

12 Jun 2013

Birthdays call for parties, so last week the Cheltenham Science Festival threw us an (early) 100th birthday bash, complete with cake, balloons and … the results of our Centenary poll on medical advances.

As Science Museum Executive and former Editor of New Scientist Roger Highfield tweeted later in the day, there’s something slightly surreal about singing Happy Birthday to a research funding body in the company of Jim Watson, co-discoverer of the structure of DNA. [...]

Continue reading: Drum roll, please …

In pictures: Mini Scientists in Edinburgh

23 Apr 2013

Six months of planning, 48 volunteers, 40 kilograms of playdough, 22,000 plastic virus spikes, 1,500 petri dishes and tubes, 30 zebrafish, eight kilograms of dried peas, and two giant ears made up the MRC’s Mini Scientists activity at the Edinburgh International Science Festival.  Organised by Hazel Lambert, our Regional Communications Manager in Scotland, the story is best told in pictures.

Thank you to Craig Nicol at the MRC Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine at the University of Edinburgh for taking the photographs. [...]

Continue reading: In pictures: Mini Scientists in Edinburgh

Wallpaper, wax and paper DNA: the tools of a mini scientist

7 Aug 2012

Mini Scientists at the Edinburgh Science Festival

Mini Scientists at the Edinburgh Science Festival

MRC Regional Communications Manager Hazel Lambert reveals a little of what goes into preparing research for curious ‘mini scientists’, just one of the activities in which MRC researchers share their expertise with thousands of people at UK science festivals every year.

Edinburgh and Glasgow are flooded with rain so wellies are essential for walking in Scotland’s cities today. I leave mine at reception in the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit where I’ve come to meet researchers who’ve been developing a game they call Health and the City. I’m looking for new ideas for Mini Scientists, the MRC lab at the Edinburgh International Science Festival where MRC-funded researchers help kids aged seven and over explore stem cells, DNA and even cell-signalling with the help of play-doh and cuddly brain cells.

PhD student Gillian Fergie shows me a tower block and tenement she has improvised out of wooden blocks and laminated paper to represent Glasgow’s housing. Using a blank roll of wallpaper liner as our city backdrop, and interlocking sections of toy road, cars and trees, we think about how we can share public health research with festival-goers. [...]

Continue reading: Wallpaper, wax and paper DNA: the tools of a mini scientist