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Insight blog: Posts tagged with science television

Stories about the people, science and research of the Medical Research Council.

Behind the picture: Charles Fletcher as the first TV doctor

26 May 2017

Nowadays few people would dispute that it’s important for people to know about medical matters, but that wasn’t always the case. While our Max Perutz Science Writing Award is open to MRC-funded PhD students, Katherine Nightingale looks back at Charles Fletcher, MRC researcher and physician, whose strong belief in medical communication led him to become the first ‘TV doctor’ in the 1950s.

Operation being filmed by the BBC

Operation being filmed by the BBC (Image courtesy of Lothian Health Services Archive, ref GD28/8/2/10)

 

You don’t notice it at first – your eye is drawn instead to the strangely bandaged faces of the people to the left of the image. But there, together with the IV stand, scissors and scrubs, is not a piece of surgical equipment but a 1950s television camera and lights.

What’s it doing there? Filming a medical drama? Broadcasting the television news live from a hospital? Not quite. Instead it’s the filming of Your Life in Their Hands, a controversial medical documentary which began in 1958. [...]

Continue reading: Behind the picture: Charles Fletcher as the first TV doctor

The other side of the screen

19 Oct 2012

Brian Cox and other members of the Horizon team on a shoot

Brian Cox and other members of the Horizon team on a shoot (Copyright: Andrew Holding)

It’s easy for scientists to complain about research being misrepresented in the news, but what happens when you drop a researcher into the crew of the BBC’s Horizon programme? MRC researcher Andrew Holding received a British Science Association Media Fellowship to do just that and tells us about the experience.

I’ll admit that I used to be something of an armchair critic of how science was reported in the media, but after my two-month fellowship experience with the BBC I have nothing but respect for the teams getting science shows onto our screens.

As I waited on an unfamiliar platform at my local train station much earlier than usual on that first morning, London instead of Cambridge-bound, I started to ponder what I was expecting. [...]

Continue reading: The other side of the screen